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Book


Dying And Living
In The Neighborhood

A Street-Level View Of America's Healthcare Promise

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Book


Dying And Living
In The Neighborhood

A Street-Level View Of America's Healthcare Promise

A path-breaking book sure to redirect inquiry in the United States on how to repair our broken health care system. While economists and politicians have suggested countless ways to tinker with the overpriced and underperforming system, Singh offers a much deeper, nuanced, and humane diagnosis of the problems. This book will stir major new thinking and creative approaches towards a more effective and decent U.S. health care system.

Jeffrey D. Sachs, Director, The Earth Institute, Columbia University

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Singh’s novel and compelling look at what really causes disease is a must-read for new physicians looking to understand sources of power and ways to leverage it in today’s paradoxical health care system.

Elizabeth H. Bradley, Yale University, coauthor of The American Healthcare Paradox: Why Spending More Is Getting Us Less


A remarkable book that bridges public health and healthcare, bringing lessons of global health to the streets of New York City. Singh is the scholar we need: data-driven, practical, but ultimately impatient. He is changing healthcare one clinic, one hospital, one neighborhood, and one city at a time.
Ashish K. Jha, Director, Harvard Global Health Institute


Unafraid of complexity, Singh persuasively argues that nothing less than health care designed by the communities it is intended to serve will set us on a path towards true population health. It is a tour de force, and left me feeling more optimistic!
Diane Meier, MD, Director, Center to Advance Palliative Care (CAPC)


At this time of health care transformation, Dr. Singh champions an innovative vision for a more integrated, community-centered approach to wellness. Drawing on real-world cases and experiences, he weaves a thought-provoking narrative of how the power of collaboration across multiple spheres can build a healthier America for everyone.
Olympia Snowe, former Senator from Maine


This brilliant and sweeping book is a rich source of insights. Prabhjot Singh draws on extensive travel, interviews and research to rightly argue that policies and business models need to be adjusted to empower neighborhoods as partners for better community health. He is one of that small, but growing, band of physicians and policymakers who recognize that better health is much more than healthcare.
— Stuart M. Butler, Senior Fellow, The Brookings Institution

Disrupting Healthcare, One Neighborhood at a Time. . . .

Prabhjot Singh’s “aha” moment came in 2011 when he attended the funeral for Ray, a patient who had died in his care. Ray was a veteran of the U.S. military who had struggled for years to find work, lived with undiagnosed diabetes and a host of chronic illnesses, and had become increasingly reclusive even as the streets of his East Harlem neighborhood became less dangerous. As he sat in the pew at Ray’s funeral, Singh—whose relationship to Ray had been typical to that of a doctor and patient and who had come to know the facts of Ray’s life through medical charts and test results—was able to understand for the first time Ray’s death in the context of his life.  He witnessed the strength of the community around Ray, heard about his unique history as a military veteran, his family’s speculation that he perhaps had been illiterate, and learned more about the environmental factors that led to his declining health. Singh realized that Ray’s death had been the result of the collective failure of many systems—education, mental health, neighborhood safety, job placement, veteran support— well before Ray had been admitted to his care.

Dr. Singh had a clear understanding then that a functioning healthcare system must look beyond the walls of hospitals and clinics and into the neighborhoods— schools, offices, places of worship, parks, and homes—where the health of communities is actually determined.  In his landmark book DYING AND LIVING IN THE NEIGHBORHOOD: A Street Level View of America’s Healthcare Promise, Singh urges:  We must discard a “one-size-fits-all” healthcare system and instead reimagine a system in which healthcare is tailored to the needs of a community and is fully integrated and embedded in our neighborhoods.  

Instead of viewing healthcare as a complicated, expensive, political quagmire designed in Washington DC and orchestrated in the halls of hospitals, what if we thought of healthcare as a collaboration between schools, places of worship, city planners, community leaders, nutritionists, fitness centers, mental health experts, and doctors? What if we utilized the latest cutting edge technologies to connect these various community institutions, provide more efficient care, and give a patient more control and accountability over their own health?

In DYING AND LIVNG IN THE NEIGHBORHOOD, Singh draws on his experience in rural sub-Saharan Africa, his research in sociology and economics, and training as a physician in East Harlem to provide a blueprint that connects the dots between communities and healthcare and introduces nationally-recognized trailblazers—doctors, administrators, community institutions, and even coders—around the country who are already successfully embedding health care in neighborhood institutions.  

DYING AND LIVING IN THE NEIGHBORHOOD is a galvanizing, innovative, and grounded call to action, one that  has the power to disrupt the healthcare industry as we know it and transform the health of our nation.

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The book is a welcome contribution to the current conversation about improving health at the population level, especially in poor communities.
Faith Mitchell, CEO of Grantmakers In Health


Dr. Singh weaves stories of history, policy, and economics, into a rich tapestry that provides both an incisive commentary on the challenges of health economics and public policy and a poignant glimpse of the impact on the lives of real people.  An important read for anyone working to transform health care and create healthy communities.
— Don Berwick, former Administrator of the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services


In many nations with few resources, models linking health services to communities are well developed. Except for scattered examples, the US system is largely disconnected from neighborhoods and their problems. With penetrating analysis and compelling storytelling, Prabhjot Singh calls for connecting our system to people and their neighborhoods, almost quite literally turning it on its head.
— Drew Altman, CEO, The Henry J. Kaiser Family Foundation


As a physician and resident of Harlem, Prabhjot Singh understands that good health has more to do with what happens in neighborhoods than in health care institutions. In Dying and Living in the Neighborhood, Dr. Singh exposes the realities and explores the solutions in an engaging, scholarly, and personal narrative.
Risa Lavizzo-Mourey, President and CEO, Robert Wood Johnson Foundation

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Speaking + Events


Speaking / Events

Speaking + Events


Speaking / Events

Healthcare Topics


 

TEDx Brooklyn

Dr. Singh works with national governments and local communities to improve the financing, implementation and delivery of community-based health systems. In this 2010 talk, he speaks about what neighborhoods like Harlem can learn from community health systems in sub-Saharan Africa.


Sparks of Brilliance

Dr. Singh discusses the healthcare model that he has brought to Harlem which is training people to take an active role in their healthcare outside the walls of a hospital or clinic.


MayoClinic Transformation 2014

Dr. Singh discusses the health care leadership in local community development. Drawing from his experiences abroad, Dr. Singh discusses the importance of community lead goal setting and discovery.

 

Events


 

14-16 September
The Transform 2016 "Makes Changes Possible: Thriving in an Ecosystem for Health"
, Rochester, MN. Additional details of this conference can be found here.

22-23 June
Aspen Global Health and Development: Aspen Ideas Incubator
, Aspen, CA. Additional details of this conference can be found here

23-26 June
Aspen Ideas Festival
, Aspen, CO. Additional details of this conference can be found here

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Media


Media

Media


Media

To fix health care, try a walk around the neighborhood.

The American health care system can be complex, to say the least, which has left some people just flat out avoiding it. This was the case for a man called “Ray” who was admitted to a Harlem-area hospital and into the care of Dr. Prabhjot Singh. Ten days later, Ray died in the hospital. Singh was early in his residency, and treating Ray forced him to reconsider not only how he cared for his patients, but the American health care system as a whole.

Singh spoke to Marketplace’s Kai Ryssdal about his book “Dying and Living in the Neighborhood: A Street-Level View of America's Healthcare Promise”.  Listen to full podcast here.


The Brian Lehrer Show

Post-Debate Fallout; Campaign Sexism; #30Issues on TPP; Chronic Disease for Low-Income Americans. Listen to the round table discussion here.


City Health Beat

The October 15, 2016 edition of "City Health Beat," hosted by NY1 health reporter Erin Billups, discusses with Dr. Prabhjot Singh health disparities in the city. and more. Watch full disucssion.

  • New trend in healthcare as yet another hospital is opting to close an aging, costly facility instead opting for smaller, updated locations in the same neighborhood.
  • State health insurance marketplace open enrollment begins November 1st.
  • New study looks at whether your hospital bed could put you at a higher risk of infection?
  • New study: Running could help improve brain health for patients with MS or other neurological disease.
  • Trying to get pregnant, try changing your diet. There are some foods that could help improve your chances

Mount Sinai doc tells Crain's about the patient whose death inspired his new book

When Dr. Prabhjot Singh attended Ray's funeral, he finally understood how chronic disease affects people over their lifetimes. Read full interview here.


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About


Meet Prabhjot

About


Meet Prabhjot

Dr. Prabhjot Singh @prabhjotsinghNY

Dr. Prabhjot Singh is Director of the Arnhold Institute for Global Health and Chair of Health System Design & Global Health at the Mount Sinai Health System, as well as Special Advisor for Strategy and Design at the Peterson Center for Healthcare. 

Previously, Prabhjot was a professor of International and Public Affairs at Columbia University and Director of Systems Design at the Earth Institute, where he was the chair of the One Million Community Health Worker Campaign. Domestically, he was founding strategic lead of City Health Works, a social enterprise that is building a scalable system of health coaching for high need patients. He also served as Vice Chairman of Medicine for Population Health at Mount Sinai.

He is a Robert Wood Johnson Foundation Young Leader, a Truman National Security Fellow, and term member of the Council on Foreign Relations. His forthcoming book, Dying and Living in the Neighborhood: A Street-Level View of America’s Healthcare Promise, will be published by Johns Hopkins University Press in 2016. 

He completed a BA & BS at University of Rochester, an MD at Cornell and PhD in Neural & Genetic Systems at Rockefeller University, with a Post-Doctoral fellowship in Sustainable Development at Columbia University.

His work has been featured or published in The New York Times, NPR, MSNBC, Huffington Post Live, PopTech, TEDx, Brookings Institute, The Daily Beast, PBS, Quora, Health Affairs, the New England Journal of Medicine and The Lancet.

 

 
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Contact


Contact Literary Group

Contact


Contact Literary Group

For review copies and media requests, please contact:

Emily Lavelle
Goldberg McDuffie Communications
elavelle@goldbergmcduffie.com


Tom Neilssen
BrightSight Group
tom@brightsightgroup.com

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